References

Note: The references below are illustrative of the content for this section of the website complementing the printed book. Additional work required includes activating hyperlinks and compiling a bibliography that integrates the chapter lists of references.

 

Introduction:  History and New Media, by David W. Park, Nicholas W. Jankowski, Steve Jones

  • Burke, Kenneth. Attitudes Toward History (3rd ed.). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1984.
  • Carey, James W. Communication as Culture: Essays on Media and Society. Boston:  Unwin Hyman, 1989.
  • Czitrom, Daniel. Media and the American Mind: From Morse to McLuhan. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1982.
  • Eisenstein, Elizabeth L. The Printing Press as an Agent of Change: Communications and Cultural Transformations in Early Modern Europe. New York: Cambridge  University Press, 1979.
  • Gitelman, Lisa. Always Already New: Media, History, and the Data of Culture. Cambridge, MA: The MIT University Press, 2006.
  • Innis, Harold A. The Bias of Communication. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1951.
  • Marvin, Carolyn. When Old Technologies Were New: Thinking About Electric Communication in the Late Nineteenth Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.
  • McLuhan, Marshall. The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1962.
  • Mumford, Lewis. Technics and Civilization. New York: Harcourt, Brace & Co, 1934.
  • Peters, Benjamin. “And Lead Us Not Into Thinking the New is New: A Bibliographic Case for New Media History,” New Media & Society, 11, no. 1/2 (2009): 13-30.
  • Peters, John Durham. “History as a Communication Problem,” In Explorations in Communication and History, edited by Barbie Zelizer, 19-34. London: Routledge,  2008.
  • Pool, Ithiel de Sola. Technologies Without Boundaries: On Telecommunications in a Global Age. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1990.
  • Rosenzweig, Roy. “Scarcity or Abundance?: Preserving the Past in a Digital Era,” The American Historical Review, 108, no. 3 (2008): 735-62.

 

Chapter 1:  Devon Powers: The End of New Music? Digital Media, History, and the Idea of Attention

  • Andrejevic, Marc. “The Work of Being Watched: Interactive Media and the Exploitation of Self-Disclosure.” Critical Studies in Media Communication vol. 19 no. 2 (2002): 230–248.
  • Bailey, Steve. “Faithful or Foolish: The Emergence of the ‘Ironic Cover Album’ and Rock Culture.” Popular Music & Society vol. 26 no. 2 (2003): 141-159.
  • Baudrillard, Jean. “The Ideological Genesis of Needs.” In The Consumer Society Reader, ed. Juliet B. Schor and Douglas B. Holt, 57-80. New York: The New Press.
  • Baum, Zygmunt. Liquid Modernity. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press, 2000.
  • Berland, Jody. “Radio Space and Industrial Time: Music Formats, Local Narratives and Technological Mediation.” Popular Music vol. 9, no. 2 (1990): 179-192.
  • Bermejo, Fernando. “Audience Manufacture in Historical Perspective: From Broadcasting to Google.” New Media & Society no. 11.1-2 (2009): 133-154.
  • Bolter, Jay David and Grusin, Richard. Remediation: Understanding New Media. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2000.
  • Bourdieu, Pierre. Distinctions: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1984.
  • Caves, Richard. Creative Industries: Contracts Between Art and Commerce. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000.
  • Crary, Jonathan.  Suspensions of Perception: Attention, Spectacle, and Modern Culture. Cambridge, The MIT Press. 1999.
  • Currid, Elizabeth and Williams, Sarah. “The Geography of Buzz: Art, Culture, and the Social Milieu in Los Angeles and New York.” Journal of Economic Geography no. 10 (2010): 423-451.
  • Davenport, Thomas and Beck, John. The Attention Economy: Understanding the New Currency of Business. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business Press, 2001.
  • Denisoff, R. Serge.  Solid Gold: The Popular Record Industry. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Books, 1975.
  • Fisher, Eran. Media and New Capitalism in the Digital Age: The Spirit of Networks. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
  • Frank, Thomas. The Conquest of Cool: Business Culture, Counterculture, and the Rise of Hip Consumerism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998.
  • Gitelman, Lisa. Always Already New: Media, History, and the Data of Culture. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2006.
  • Goldhaber, Michael. “The Attention Economy and the Net.” First Monday vol. 2 no. 4 (1997). Accessed May 21, 2010 http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/519/440.
  • Grainge, Paul. “Nostalgia and Style in Retro America: Moods, Modes, and Media Recycling.” Journal of American and Comparative Cultures vol. 23 no. 1(2000): 27-34.
  • Hakanen, Ernest. “Counting Down to Number One: the Evolution of the Meaning of Popular Music Charts.” Popular Music vol. 17 no. 1 (1998): 95-111.
  • Harvey, David. The Condition of Postmodernity: An Enquiry into the Origins of Cultural Change. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 1990.
  • Harvey, Eric. “To Hold You In Time: Animal Collective Fandom and the Pre-History of a Digital Music Commodity.” Paper delivered at the International Association for the Study of Popular Music conference, April 8-11 2010.
  • Hirsch, Paul. “Processing Fads and Fashions: An Organization-Set Analysis of Cultural Industry Systems.” The American Journal of Sociology vol. 77 no. 4(1972): 639-659.
  • Jones, Steve. “Music that Moves: Popular Music, Distribution and Network Technologies.” Cultural Studies vol. 16 no. 2 (2002): 213-232.
  • Jones, Steve and Kevin Featherly. “Re-Viewing Rock Writing: Narratives of Popular Music Criticism.”  In Pop Music and the Press, ed. Steve Jones, 19-40. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2002.
  • Kassabian, Anahid. “Ubiquitous Listening.” In Popular Music Studies, ed. David Hesmondhalgh and Keith Negus, 131-142. London: Arnold, 2002.
  • Keightley, Keir. “Long Play: Adult-Oriented Popular Music and the Temporal Logics of the Post-War Sound Recording Industry in the USA.” Media, Culture & Society no. 26 (2004): 375-391.
  • Lee, Benjamin and LiPuma, Edward. “Cultures of Circulation: The Imaginations of Modernity.” Public Culture vol. 14 no. 1(2002): 191-213.
  • Leyshon, Andrew, Webb, Peter, French, Shaun, Thrift, Nigel, and Crewe, Louise. “On The Reproduction of the Musical Economy after the Internet.” Media, Culture & Society no. 27 (2005): 177-209.
  • Lipsitz, George. Time Passages: Collective Memory and American Popular Culture. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1991.
  • Millard, Andre. America on Record: A History of Recorded Sound. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995.
  • Milner, Greg. Perfecting Sound Forever: An Aural History of Recorded Music. New York: Farber and Farber, 2009.
  • Negus, Keith. “The Work of Cultural Intermediaries and the Enduring Distance Between Production and Consumption.” Cultural Studies vol. 16 no. 4(2002): 501-515.
  • Peters, Ben. “And lead is not into thinking the new is new: a bibliographic case for new media history.” New Media & Society 11 nos. 1-2(2009): 13-30.
  • Poster, Mark. “Underdetermination.” New Media & Society 1 no.1 (1999): 12-17.
  • Powers, Devon. “Bruce Springsteen, Rock Criticism, and the Music Business: Towards a Theory and History of Hype.” Popular Music and Society (Forthcoming 2011).
  • Powers, Devon. Rock Criticism and Intellectual History at the Village Voice. Ph.D. diss., New York University, 2008.
  • Schumpeter, Joseph. “The Process of Creative Destruction.” In Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy, 81-86. New York: Routledge, 1994
  • Shane, Ed. “Modern Radio Formats: Trends and Possibilities.” Journal of Radio Studies no. 3(1995): 3-9.
  • Sisario, Ben. “In Death as in Life, Michael Jackson Sets Music Sales Records.” The New York Times, July 2, 2009.
  • Smith, Herbert. “Designing Organizations for an Information-Rich World.” In Computers, Communications, and the Public Interest, 37-72. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1971.
  • Sterne, Jonathan. The Audible Past: Cultural Origins of Sound Recording. Raleigh, NC: Duke University Press, 2003.
  • Sterne, Jonathan. “The MP3 as Cultural Artifact.” New Media & Society 8 (2006): 825-842.
  • Suisman, David. Selling Sounds: The Commercial Revolution in American Music. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009.
  • Treitler, Leo. Music and the Historical Imagination. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1989.
  • Turow, Joseph. Niche Envy: Marketing Discrimination in the Digital Age. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2006.
  • Watts, Duncan. Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2003.
  • Wasik, Bill. And Then There’s This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture. New York: Viking, 2009.

 

Chapter 2:  Noah Arceneaux: “All You’ll Need is a Mobile Couch”: The History of Mobile Television in the United States

(still to be inserted)

 

Chapter 3:  Stephanie Ricker Schulte: Cutting the Cord and “Crying Socialist Wolf”: Unwiring the Public and Producing the Third Place

(still to be inserted)


Chapter 4: Christian Thorsten Callisen & Barbara Adkins: Pre-Digital Virtuality: Early Modern Scholars and the Republic of Letters

  • Adkins, Barbara, and Jason Nasarczyk. “Asynchronicity and the ‘Time Envelope’ of Online Annotation: The Case of the Photosharing Website, Flickr.” Australian Journal of Communication 35, no. 3 (2009): 115–40.
  • Austin, Kenneth, and Wendy Anderson. “Faith, Friendship and Learning: Intercultural Communication in the Republic of Letters.” Language and Intercultural Communication 10, no. 1 (2010): 17–31.
  • Behringer, Wolfgang. “Communications Revolutions: A Historiographical Concept,” translated by Richard Deveson. German History 24, no. 3 (2006): 333–74.
  • Borgman, Christine L. Scholarship in the Digital Age: Information, Infrastructure and the Internet. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2007.
  • Bourdieu, Pierre. “The Specificity of the Scientific Field and the Social Conditions for the Progress of Reason.” Social Science Information 14, no. 6 (1975): 19–47.
  • Briggs, Asa, and Peter Burke. A Social History of the Media: From Gutenberg to the Internet, 3rd edn. Cambridge: Polity, 2009.
  • Bruns, Axel. Blogs, Wikipedia, Second Life, and Beyond. New York: Peter Lang, 2008.
  • Burke, Peter. “Erasmus and the Republic of Letters.” European Review 7, no. 1 (1999): 5–17.
  • Callisen, Christian T., and Barbara Adkins. “The Old Face of ‘New’ Social Networks: The Republic of Letters as a Virtual Community.” Paper presented at the 11th annual conference for the Association of Internet Researchers, Gothenburg, October 21–23, 2010.
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  • Fumaroli, Marc. “The Republic of Letters,” translated by R. Scott Walker. Diogenes 143 (1988): 129–52.
  • Goffman, Erving. “Felicity’s Condition.” The American Journal of Sociology 89, no. 1 (1983): 1–53.
  • Goldgar, Anne. Impolite Learning: Conduct and Community in the Republic of Letters, 1680–1750. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995.
  • Grafton, Anthony. Worlds Made by Words: Scholarship and Community in the Modern West. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009.
  • Haydu, Jeffrey. “Making Use of the Past: Time Periods as Cases to Compare and as Sequences of Problem Solving.” The American Journal of Sociology 104, no. 2 (1998): 339–71.
  • Howell, John. Epistolæ Ho-Elianæ: Familiar Letters Domestic and Forren; Divided into Six Sections, Partly Historicall, Politicall, Philosophicall, Upon Emergent Occasions. London: For Humphrey Moseley, 1645. Accessed July 7, 2010. In Early English Books Online. http://eebo.chadwyck.com.
  • Hunt, Arnold, and Alison Shell. “The Book as Gift in Elizabethan Durham: Barnabe Barnes’s A Divine Centurie of Spiritual Sonnets.” In Scott, Collaboration and Interdisciplinarity, 117–33.
  • Knorr Cetina, Karin. “The Synthetic Situation: Interactionism for a Global World.” Symbolic Interaction 32, no. 1 (2009): 67–87.
  • Lashmore-Davies, Adrian C., ed. “The Correspondence of Henry St. John and Sir William Trumbull, 1698–1710.” Special issue, Eighteenth-Century Life 32, no. 3 (2008).
  • Lee, Kwan M. “Presence, Explicated.” Communication Theory 14, no. 1 (2004): 27–50.
  • Maber, Richard. “Knowledge as Commodity in the Republic of Letters, 1675–1700.” Seventeenth-Century French Studies 27 (2005): 197–208.
  • Maber, Richard. “Texts, Travel, and Flying Machines: The Lost World of Seventeenth-Century Scholarship.” In Scott, Collaboration and Interdisciplinarity, 229–48.
  • Mauelshagen, Franz. “Networks of Trust: Scholarly Correspondence and Scientific Exchange in Early Modern Europe.” The Medieval History Journal 6, no. 1 (2003): 1–32.
  • McNeely, Ian F., and Lisa Wolverton. Reinventing Knowledge: From Alexandria to the Internet. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2008.
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  • Peters, Benjamin. “And Lead Us Not into Thinking the New is New: A Bibliographic Case for New Media History.” New Media and Society 11, nos 1–2 (2009): 13–31.
  • Scott, Paul, ed. Collaboration and Interdisciplinarity in the Republic of Letters: Essays in Honour of Richard G. Maber. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2010.
  • Shields, Rob. The Virtual. London: Routledge, 2003.
  • Stegeman, Saskia. “How to Set Up a Scholarly Correspondence: Theodorus Janssonius van Almeloveen (1657–1712) Aspires to Membership of the Republic of Letters.” Translated by P. J. E. Hyams. Lias, vol. 20, no. 2 (1993): 227–43.
  • Zhao, Shanyang. “Consociated Contemporaries as an Emergent Realm of the Lifeworld: Extending Schutz’s Phenomenological Analysis to Cyberspace.” Human Studies 27, no. 1 (2004): 91–105.
  • Zhao, Shanyang, and David Elesh. “Copresence as ‘Being With.’ ” Information, Communication and Society 11, no. 4 (2008): 565–83.

 

Chapter 5:  D. Travers Scott: Sound Studies for Historians of New Media

  • Acland, Charles. R. ed., Residual Media. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2007.
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  • Attali, Jacques. Noise: The Political Economy of Music. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1989.
  • Auner, Joseph. “’Sing It For Me’: Posthuman Ventriloquism in Recent Popular Music,” Journal of the Royal Musical Association, 128(1), 98-122.
  • Barthes, Roland. The Responsibility of Forms. Oxford, UK: Blackwell, 1986.
  • Beck, Jay and Tony Grajeda, eds., Lowering the Boom: Critical Studies in Film Sound. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2008.
  • Berry, Chris, Fran Martin, and Audrey Yue, eds. Mobile Cultures: New Media in Queer Asia. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2002.
  • Bull, Michael and Les Back, eds., The Auditory Culture Reader. New York: Berg, 2003.
  • Castells, Manuel, Mireia Fernández-Ard’evol, Jack Qiu, and Araba Sey, Mobile Communication and Society: A Global Perspective. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2007.
  • Chun, Wendy H. K. Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006.
  • Cruz, Jon. Culture on the Margins: The Black Spiritual and the Rise of American Cultural Interpretation. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999.
  • Cusick, Suzanne G. “Music as torture / Music as weapon.” Transcultural Music Review 10 (2006). Accessed September 21, 2010.
  • de Sola Pool, Ithiel, Craig Decker, Stephen Dizard, Kay Israel, Pamela Rubin, and Barry Weinstein, “Foresight and Hindsight: The Case of the Telephone,” in The Social Impact of the Telephone, ed. Ithiel de Sola Pool. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1977, 127-157, 136.
  • Demers, Joanna. Steal this Music: How Intellectual Property Law Affects Musical Creativity. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006.
  • Douglas, Susan J. Inventing American Broadcasting, 1899-1922. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989.
  • ——— Listening In: Radio and the American Imagination. New York City: Random House, 1999.
  • du Gay, Paul, Stuart Hall, Linda Janes, Hugh Mackay, and Keith Negus. Doing Cultural Studies: The Story of the Sony Walkman. London: Sage, 1997.
  • Dyson, Frances. Sounding New Media: Immersion and Embodiment in the Arts and Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009.
  • Fink, Jennifer Natalya and June Reich, eds., “Staging Sound: Feminism and Re/Production,” Women & Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory 9.2, 18.
  • Fischer, Claude. America Calling: A Social History of the Telephone to 1940. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992.
  • Frank, Felicia M. The Mechanical Song: Women, Voice, and the Artificial in Nineteenth-century French Narrative. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1995.
  • Gitelman, Lisa. Always Already New: Media, History and the Data of Culture. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2006.
  • Gleick, James. “The Telephone Transformed-Into Almost Everything,” The New York Times, May 16, 1993, 62.
  • Gray, Herman. Cultural moves: African Americans and the politics of representation. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005.
  • Hargittai, Esther. “Radio’s Lessons for the Internet.” Communications of the Association for Computing Machinery, 43(1).
  • Hilmes, Michelle. Radio Voices: American Broadcasting, 1922-1952. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997.
  • ———, ed. “In Focus: Sound Studies,” Cinema Journal 48, 1, 114-156.
  • Hosokawa, Shuhei. “The Walkman Effect.” Popular Music(4), 165-180.
  • Huyssen, Andreas. After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass Culture, Postmodernism. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2003.
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  • Kittler, Freidrich A. Gramophone, Film, Typewriter. Stanford, CT: Stanford University Press, 1999.
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  • Lipsitz, George. Dangerous Crossroads: Popular Music, Postmodernism and the Poetics of Place. New York: Verso, 1994.
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  • Marvin, Carolyn. When Old Technologies Were New: Thinking About Electric Communication in the Late Nineteenth Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.
  • Moten, Fred. In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2003.
  • Ong, Walter J. Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word. London: Methuen & Co., Ltd., 1996.
  • Pierce, John R. Signals: The Telephone and Beyond. San Francisco: W.H. Freeman and Company, 1981.
  • Ronell, Avital. The Telephone Book: Technology, Schizophrenia, Electric Speech. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 1989.
  • Schwartz, Hillel. “Afterword: The Indefensible Ear: A History,” in The Auditory Culture Reader, eds. Michael Bull and Les Back. New York: Berg, 2003, 487-502.
  • Sconce, Jeffrey Haunted Media: Electronic Presence from Telegraphy to Television. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2000.
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  • Suzuki, Koji. Ring. New York: Vertical, 2003.
  • ———Spiral. New York: Vertical, 2005.
  • ———Loop. New York: Vertical, 2006.
  • ———Birthday. New York: Vertical, 2006.
  • Taylor, Tim D. Strange Sounds: Music, Technology & Culture. New York: Routledge, 2001.
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  • Weheliye, Andrew G. Phonographies: Grooves in Sonic Afro-modernity. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2005.
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  • Wurtzler, Steve J. Electric Sounds: Technological Change and the Rise of Corporate Mass Media. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007.

 

Chapter 6:  Zizi Papacharissi & Elaine Yuan: What if the Internet Did Not Speak English? New and Old Language for Studying Newer Media Technologies

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  • de Souza e Silva, Adriana. “From Simulations to Hybrid Space: How Nomadic Technologies Change the Real.” Technoetic Arts, 1 (2004): 209-221.
  • Deleuze, Gilles. Difference and Repetition. New York: Columbia University Press, 1994.
  • Deleuze, Gilles and Felix Guattarri. A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1987.
  • Dibbel, Julian. My Tiny Life: Crime and Passion in a Virtual World. New York: Henry Holt and Company, Inc, 1999.
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  • Gibson, William. Neuromancer. New York: Ace Books, 1994.
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  • Hayles, N. Katherine. How We Became Posthuman—Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1999.
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  • Irwin, William. The Matrix and Philosophy: Welcome to the Desert of the Real. Chicago and La Salle, Illinois: Open Court, 2002.
  • Johnson, Steven. Interface Culture: How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate. San Francisco: Harper Edge, 1997.
  • Katz, James and Mark Aakhus.  Perpetual Contact: Mobile Communication, Private Talk, Public Performance. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Cambridge University Press, 2002.
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  • Poster, Mark. What’s the Matter with the Internet? Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2001.
  • Rheingold, Howard. The Virtual Community: Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2000.
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  • Shields, Rob. The Virtual. New York: Routledge, 2003.
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  • Turkle, Sherry. Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995.
  • Warner Bros. The Matrix. Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video, 1999.

 

Chapter 7:  Teresa M. Harrison: The Evolving Medium is the Message: McLuhan, Medium Theory, and Cognitive Neuroscience

(still to be inserted)


Chapter 8:  Dmitry Epstein: The Analog History of the ‘Digital Divide’

(still to be inserted)


Chapter 9:  Michael Dick: Twenty Years of Unnecessary Forward Slashes: Towards a Post-ontological Critique of Narratives of the Development of the Web

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  • –––, Wendy Hall, James A. Hendler, Kieron O’Hara, Nigel Shadbolt, and Daniel J. Weitzner. “A framework for Web Science.” Foundations and Trends in Web Science 1,  no. 1 (2006):   1-130.
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  • –––, James Hendler, and Ora Lassila. “The Semantic Web.” Scientific American 284, no. 5 (May 2001): 34-43.
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  • Heath, Tom. “How will we interact with the web of data?” IEEE Internet Computing 12, no. 5 (2008): 88-91.
  • Hendler, James. “Web 3.0: Chicken farms on the Semantic Web.” Computer 41, no. 1 (January 2008): 106-108.
  • –––. “Web 3.0 emerging.” Computer 42, no. 1 (January 2009): 111-113.
  • –––, Nigel Shadbolt, Wendy Hall, Tim Berners-Lee, and Daniel Weitzner. “Web Science: An  interdisciplinary approach to understanding the Web.” Communications of the ACM 51,  no. 7 (2008): 60-69.
  • Hughes, Thomas P. Human-built world: How to think about technology and culture. Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 2004.
  • –––. “The evolution of large technological systems.” In The social construction of technological systems: New directions in the sociology and history of technology, edited by Wiebe E. Bijker, Thomas P. Hughes, and Trevor Pinch, 51-82. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1987.
  • Latour, Bruno. “Where are the missing masses? The sociology of a few mundane artifacts.” In   Shaping technology/building society: Studies in sociotechnical change, edited by Wiebe    E. Bijker, and John Law, 225-258. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1992.
  • MacKenzie, Donald. Knowing machines: Essays on technical change. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1996.
  • Misa, Thomas J. “Retrieving sociotechnical change from technological determinism.” In Does technology drive history? The dilemma of technological determinism, edited by Merritt R. Smith, and Leo Marx, 115-141. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1994.
  • O’Hara, Kieron, and Wendy Hall. “Web Science.” Association of Learning Technologies Newsletter, no. 12 (May 2008).
  • Pinch, Trevor J., and Wiebe E. Bijker. “The social construction of facts and artifacts: Or how the sociology of science and the sociology of technology might benefit each other.” In The social construction of technological systems: New directions in the sociology and history of technology, edited by Wiebe E. Bijker, Thomas P. Hughes, and Trevor Pinch, 17-50. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1987.
  • Runciman, David. “Like boiling a frog: Review of the book The Wikipedia Revolution.” London Review of Books 31, no. 10 (2009): 14-16. Accessed March 30, 2010.  http://www.lrb.co.uk/v31/n10/david-runciman/like-boiling-a-frog.
  • Science Business Publishing. “New Web research at network gets off the ground.” Science|Business, April 29, 2010. Accessed May 1, 2010. http://bulletin.sciencebusiness.net.
  • Shadbolt, Nigel, and Tim Berners-Lee. “Web Sciences Emerges”, or “Web Science: Studying the Internet to protect our future”. Scientific American 299, no. 4 (October 2008): 32-37 or 76-81.
  • –––, Wendy Hall, and Tim Berners-Lee. “The Semantic Web revisited.” IEEE Intelligent Systems 21, no. 3 (2006): 96-101.
  • Shneiderman, Ben. “Web Science: A provocative invitation to Computer Science.” Communications of the ACM 50, no. 6 (2007): 25-27.
  • Tetlow, Philip. The Web’s awake: An introduction to the field of Web Science and the concept of  Web life. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley, 2007.
  • Thomson, Rebecca. “Web science: Exploring the network without guesswork.” New Scientist,   May 10, 2010. Accessed May 12, 2010. http://www.newscientist.com.
  • Warren, Paul, and John Davies. “The Semantic Web – from vision to reality.” In ICT futures:  Delivering pervasive, real-time and secure services, edited by Paul Warren, John Davies, and David Brown, 55-66. West Sussex, England: John Wiley & Sons, 2008.
  • Web Science Trust. “Creating a science of the Web (project website; people; research roadmap).” Accessed April 25, 2010, and July 14, 2010. http://www.webscience.org,   http://webscience.org/people.html, and http://webscienceoc.org/research/roadmap.html.
  • World Wide Web Consortium. “Project website.” Accessed April 25, 2010. http://www.w3.org.
  • Wright, Alex. “Searching the Deep Web.” Communications of the ACM 51, no. 10 (2008): 14- 15.

 

Chapter 10:  Peter Schaefer: Interface: History of a Concept, 1868-1888

  • Barney, W. C. “Who Is the True Inventor of the Bell Telephone?” The Telegraphic Journal and Electrical Review 7 (May 6, 1882): 331.
  • Bottomley, James T. Hydrostatics; or, Theoretical Mechanics Part II. Glasgow: William Collins, Sons, & Co., 1882.
  • Bright, Charles. Submarine Telegraphs: Their History, Construction, and Working. London: Crosby, Lockwood and Son, 1898.
  • Galison, Peter. Einstein’s Clocks, Poincaré’s Maps: Empires of Time. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2003.
  • Hunt, Bruce J. The Maxwellians. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1991.
  • Leff, Harvey S. and Andrew F. Rex, eds. Maxwell’s Demon 2: Entropy, Classical and Quantum Information, Computing. Bristol: Institute of Physics Publishing, 2003.
  • Maxwell, James Clerk. Theory of Heat. London: Spottiswoode and Co., 1871.
  • Maxwell, James Clerk. Theory of Heat. 4th ed. London: Spottiswoode and Co., 1875.
  • Maxwell, James Clerk. The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell, Volume III 1874-1879, Edited by P. M. Harman. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.
  • Peters, John Durham. “Space, Time, and Communication Theory,” Canadian Journal of Communication 28 (2003): 397-411.
  • Smith, Crosbie and M. Norton Wise. Energy and Empire: A Biographical Study of Lord Kelvin. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989.
  • Thomson, James. Collected Papers in Physics and Engineering, Edited by Sir Joseph Larmor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1912.
  • Thomson, William. “On a Universal Tendency in Nature to the Dissipation of Mechanical Energy,” in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Vol. 3: December 1850 to April 1857, 139-142. Edinburgh: Neil and Company, 1857.
  • Thomson, William. “Kinetic Theory of the Dissipation of Energy,” Nature 9 (April 9, 1874): 441-444.
  • Thomson, William. “A Simple Hypothesis for Electro-Magnetic Induction of Incomplete Circuits; with Consequent Equations of Electric Motion in Fixed Homogenous or Heterogeneous Solid Matter,” The Electrical Engineer 2 (October 5, 1888): 290-291.
  • Thomson, William. Baltimore Lectures on Molecular Dynamics and the Wave Theory of Light. London: C.J. Clay and Sons, 1904.
  • Thomson, William. Kelvin’s Baltimore Lectures and Modern Theoretical Physics; Historical and Philosophical Perspectives. Edited by Robert H. Kargon and Peter Achinstein. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1987.
  • Wise, M. Norton. “Mediating Machines,” Science in Context 2 (1988): 77-113.

 

Chapter 11:  Brian O’Neill: The Long History of Digital Radio: Old Media in a New Century

  • Ala-Fossi, Marko. “Technological Landscapes of Radio.” In Digital Radio in Europe: Technologies, Industries and Cultures, edited by Brian O’Neill, Marko Ala-Fossi, Per Jauert, Stephen Lax, Lars Nyre and Helen Shaw, 44-65. Bristol: Intellect Books, 2010.
  • Ala-Fossi, Marko, and Alan G. Stavitsky. “Understanding Iboc: Digital Technology for Analog Economics.” Journal of Radio Studies 10, no. 1 (2003): 63-80.
  • Anglin, R. L. “Digital Audio Broadcasting United States Technologies and Systems, Terrestrial and Satellite.” Electronics Information & Planning 23, no. 3 (1995): 129-40.
  • Bower, A J. “Digital Radio – the Eureka 147 DAB System.” Electronic Engineering, no. April 1998 (1998): 55-56.
  • Briggs, Asa, and Peter Burke. A Social History of the Media : From Gutenberg to the Internet. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Polity, 2005.
  • Collins, Richard. “Europe’s Digital Revolution: Broadcasting Regulation, the EU and the Nation State.” Telecommunications Policy 24, no. 10-11 (2000): 981-83.
  • EBU-UER. Public Radio in Europe 2007. Geneva: European Broadcasting Union, 2007.
  • Eureka-147. “Eureka Project 147- DAB (Imp).”  Accessed July 15, 2010. http://www.eureka.be/.
  • European Telecommunications Standards Institute. Radio Broadcasting Systems; Digital Audio Broadcasting (Dab) to Mobile, Portable and Fixed Receivers. Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France, 2006.
  • Flint, Joe. “Electronics Group, NAB Team for In-Band Digital Radio.” Broadcasting & Cable 123, no. 11 (1993): 51.
  • Fox, Barry. “The Perfect Sound Machine.” The Times, October 14, 1994, Friday 1994.
  • ———. “Radio Sans Frontieres: By the Mid 1990s, People Driving across Europe Should Be Able to Tune into Their Favourite Radio Programmes in Hi-Fi Wherever They Are.” New Scientist, 1991, 29.
  • Gandy, C. “DAB: An Introduction to the Eureka Dab System and a Guide to How It Works.” In BBC R&D White Paper. London: BBC, 2003.
  • Hakanen, E. A. “Digital Audio Broadcasting – Promises and Policy Issues in the USA.” Telecommunications Policy 15, no. 6 (1991): 491-96.
  • Hoeg, Wolfgang, and Thomas Lauterbach. Digital Audio Broadcasting Principles and Applications of Digital Radio. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2003.
  • Immink, Kees A. Schouhamer. “The Compact Disc Story.” Journal of the AES 46 (1998): 458-65.
  • Josse, Delphine. “DAB — Now Hitting the Market on an Industrial Scale.” EBU Technical Review October 2002, no. 292 (2002).
  • Kozamernik, Franc. “Digital Audio Broadcasting – Coming out of the Tunnel.” EBU Technical Review No. 279, (1999).
  • ———. “Digital Audio Broadcasting — Radio Now and for the Future.” EBU Technical Review Autumn 1995, No. 265 (1995).
  • Lau, A., and W.F. Williams. “Service Planning for Terrestrial Digital Audio Broadcasting.” EBU Technical Review Summer 1992, no. 252 (1992).
  • Lax, Stephen. “‘a Vision for Radio’: Engineering Solutions for Changing Audiences – from FM to DAB.” In Digital Radio in Europe: Technologies, Industries and Cultures, edited by Brian O’Neill, Marko Ala-Fossi, Per Jauert, Stephen Lax, Lars Nyre and Helen Shaw, 69-84. Bristol: Intellect Books, 2010.
  • Lembke, Johan. Competition for Technological Leadership: EU Policy for High Technology. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2003.
  • Levy, David A. Europe’s Digital Revolution Broadcasting Regulation, the EU, and the Nation State. New York: Routledge, 1999.
  • Maddocks, M.C.D. “Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB)-Radio for Tomorrow.” Paper presented at the IEE Colloquium on Audio Engineering, London, UK, 1994.
  • Marks, Bev. “The Humidab Project – Looking at the Human Machine Interface of Digital Radios.” EBU Technical Review 278, (1998).
  • Müller-Römer, F. “DAB Progress Report — 1997.” EBU Technical Review, No. 274 (1997).
  • Riley, J. “DAB Multiplex and System Support Features.” EBU Technical Review No. 259, (1994).
  • Rudin, Richard, W. A. Kelly Huff, Gregory Ferrel Lowe, and Graham Mytton. “Digital Audio Broadcasting.” In Museum of Broadcast Communications Encyclopedia of Radio, edited by Christopher Sterling, 456-62. New York: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, 2004.
  • Scannell, Paddy. “The Ontology of Radio”. ” In Digital Radio in Europe: Technologies, Industries and Cultures, edited by Brian O’Neill, Marko Ala-Fossi, Per Jauert, Stephen Lax, Lars Nyre and Helen Shaw, 11-16. Bristol: Intellect Books, 2010.
  • Shaw, Helen. “The Online Transformation: How the Internet Is Challenging and Changing Radio.” In Digital Radio in Europe: Technologies, Industries and Cultures, edited by Brian O’Neill, Marko Ala-Fossi, Per Jauert, Stephen Lax, Lars Nyre and Helen Shaw, 215-36. Bristol: Intellect Books, 2010.
  • Shelswell., P., C. Gandy, J.L. Riley, and M. Maddocks. “Digital Audio Broadcasting.” Paper presented at the IEE Colloquium on Vehicle Audio Systems, London, UK, December 6, 1991.
  • Spikofski, Gerhard, and Siegfried Klar. “DAB and CD Quality — Reality or Illusion.” EBU Technical Review No. 296 (2003).
  • Tuttlebee, W.H.W.  and D.A. Hawkins. “Consumer Digital Radio: From Concept to Reality.” Electronics & Communication Engineering Journal 10, no. 6 (1998): 263-76.
  • Witherow, D. “Digital Audio Broadcasting – on the Way.” EBU Technical Review No. 270 (1996).
  • Witherow, D.M.L.  and P.A. Laven. “Digital Audio Broadcasting-the Future of Radio.” Paper presented at the International Broadcasting Convention, IBC, Amsterdam, Netherlands, September 14-18, 1995.
  • World Broadcasting Unions. “Digital Radio Guide.” 1998. Accessed 15 July, 2010. http://www.abu.org.my/public/documents/DRG-2007-Final.pdf
  • Yamauchi, K., S. Kakiuchi, A.Takebe, and M.Sugitomo. “Digital Audio Broadcasting Receiver Development.” Paper presented at the International Broadcasting Convention, IBC 1995, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1995.

 

Chapter 12:  Benjamin Peters & Deborah Lubken: New Media in Crises: Discursive Instability and Emergency Communication

  • Abbate, Janet. Inventing the Internet. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1999.
  • American Fire Alarm Telegraph. New York, 1854.
  • Altman, Rick. Silent Film Sound. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
  • Aspray, William and Paul Ceruzzi. The Internet and American Business. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2008.
  • Baran, Paul. On Distributed Communications. Memorandum RM-3420-PR. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation, 1964.
  • Bosch, Adam. “Historical Sketch of the Fire Alarm Telegraph.” Transactions of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers 14 (1897): 335-50.
  • Brand, Stewart. “Founding Father.” Wired (1991).
  • Castells, Manuel. Internet Galaxy: Reflections on the Internet, Business and Society. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.
  • Flew, Terry. New Media: An Introduction. Oxford University Press, 2002.
  • Forrest, Clarence H. Official History of the Fire Department of the City of Baltimore. Baltimore, 1898.
  • Gitelman, Lisa. Always Already New: Media, History and the Data of Culture. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006.
  • Gitelman, Lisa and Geoffrey B. Pingree, ed. New Media, 1740-1915. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003.
  • Hafner, Katie and Matthew Lyon. Where the Wizards Stay up Late. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2000.
  • Henriksen, Margot A. Dr. Strangelove’s America: Society and Culture in the Atomic Age. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.
  • Katz, Elihu. “The End of Television?” ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 625 (2009): 6-18.
  • Kernan, J. Frank. Reminiscences of the Old Fire Laddies and Volunteer Fire Departments of New York and Brooklyn. New York: M. Crane, 1885.
  • Light, Jennifer. “Facsimile: A Forgotten ‘New Medium’ from the 20th Century.” New Media and Society 8, no. 3 (2006): 355-78.
  • Manovich, Lev. The Language of New Media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Marvin, Carolyn. When Old Technologies Were New: Thinking About Electric Communication in the Late Nineteenth Century. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 1988.
  • McLuhan, Marshall. “The Later Innis.” Queen’s Quarterly 60, no. 3 (1953): 385–94.
  • McMahon, Robert J. The Cold War: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press: 2003.
  • O’Neill, Judy. “Interview with Paul Baran.” Charles Babbage Institute, OH 182, March 5, 1990, Menlo Park, CA.
  • Peters, Benjamin. “And Lead Us Not into Thinking the New is New: A Bibliographic Case for New Media History.” New Media and Society 11, no. 1 & 2 (2009): 13-30.
  • Peters, John Durham. “Calendar, Clock, Tower.” In Deus in Machina: Religion and Technology in Historical Perspective, edited by Jeremy Stolow. New York: Fordham University Press, forthcoming.
  • ———. “Calendar.” Encyclopedia of Religion, Communication, and Media, edited by Daniel A. Stout, 57-9. New York: Routledge, 2006.
  • ———. “Clock.” Encyclopedia of Religion, Communication, and Media, edited by Daniel A. Stout, 77-9. New York: Routledge, 2006.
  • ———. “Communication.” Encyclopedia of Religion, Communication, and Media, edited by Daniel A. Stout, 83-6. New York: Routledge, 2006.
  • Review of The Progress of the Nation, in Its Various Social and Economical Relations, from the Beginning of the Nineteenth Century to the Present Time, Sections III. and IV., by G. R. Porter, Esq. F. R. S. Journal of the Statistical Society of London 1, no. 1 (1838): 27-33.
  • Silverstone, Roger. “What’s New about New Media?” New Media and Society 1, no. 1 (1999): 10-12.
  • Spigel, Lynn and Jan Olsson, eds. Television after TV: Essays on a Medium in Transition. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004.
  • Sterne, Jonathan. The Audible Past: Cultural Origins of Sound Reproduction. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2003.
  • Tebeau, Mark. Eating Smoke: Fire in Urban America, 1800-1950. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.
  • Turner, Graeme and Jinna Tay, eds. Television Studies after TV: Understanding Television in the Post-Broadcast Era. London: Routledge, 2009.
  • Wardrip-Fruin, Noah and Nick Montfort, eds. The New Media Reader. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003.
  • Weart, Spencer R. Nuclear Fear: A History of Images. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988.

Public Documents

  • A Compilation of the Laws of the State of New York; Also, of the Ordinances, Resolutions and Orders Established by the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonality of the City of New York, in Common Council Convened, Relating to the Fire Department of the City of New York, From 1812 to 1855. New York: McSpedon & Baker, 1855.
  • Annual Reports of the Board of Commissioners of the Metropolitan Fire Department, for the Years 1865 and 1866. New York: Baker & Godwin, 1867.
  • Laws and Ordinances Ordained and Established by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonality of the City of New-York, in Common Council Convened, During the Mayorality of Jacob Radcliff. Passed the Fifth Day of May, 1817. New York: T. and J. Swords, 1817.
  • Minutes of the Common Council of the City of New York: 1675-1776. Vols. 1-8. New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1905.
  • Minutes of the Common Council of the City of New York: 1784-1831. Vols. 1-19. New York: City of New York, 1917.
  • Record of Proceedings before the United States Patent Office: Application for an Extension of Letters Patent No. 17, 355. Granted to William F. Channing and Moses G. Farmer, May 19th, 1857. New York: Kilbourne Tompkins, 1871.
  • Report of the Committee on a Paid Fire Department, Made to Common Council, May 5th, 1859. Philadelphia, 1859.

 

Chapter 13:  Holly Kruse: Pipeline as Network: Pneumatic Systems and the Social Order

(still to be inserted)


Chapter 14:  Gerard Goggin: Telephone Media: An Old Story

(still to be inserted)


Chapter 15:  Meghan Dougherty & Steven M. Schneider: Web Historiography and the Emergence of New Archival Forms

  • Brügger, Niels. Archiving Websites: General Considerations and Strategies. Aarhus, Denmark: Centre for Internet Research, 2005., http://www.cfi.au.dk/publikationer/archiving/pdf.
  • Deitz, Steve. “The Database Imaginary: Memory_Archive_Database v 4.0.” 2004. http://databaseimaginary.banff.org/getEssay.php?id=1&t=1 (accessed June 13, 2010).
  • Derrida, Jaques. Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1995.
  • Dougherty, Meghan and Charles van den Heuvel. “Historical Infrastructures for Web Archiving: Annotation of Ephemeral Collections for Research and Cultural Heritage.” Paper presented at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 6th Media in Transition conference, Cambridge, MA, April 24-26, 2009.
  • Foot, Kirsten A. “Pursuing an Evolving Object: Object formation and identification in a conflict monitoring network.” Mind, Culture and Activity 9 (2002): 132-49.
  • Foot, Kirsten A. and Steven M. Schneider. “Object-Oriented Web Historiography.” In Web History, edited by Niels Brügger, 61-82. New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2010.
  • Graham, Beryl and Sarah Cook. Rethinking Curating: Art After New Media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2010.
  • Jacobsen, Mogens and Morten Søndergaard, eds. Re_Action: The Digital Archive Experience. Aalborg, Denmark: Aalborg University Press, 2009.
  • Levy, David. Scrolling Forward. New York: Arcade Publishing, 2001.
  • Mayer – Schonberger, Viktor. Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age. Princeton, NJ:  Princeton University Press, 2009.
  • Nelson, Ted. Literary Machines 93.1. Sausalito, CA:  Mindful Press, 1993.
  • Ong, Walter. Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word. New York, NY: Routledge, 1982.
  • Paul, Christiane ed. New Media in the White Cube and Beyond: Curatorial Models for Digital Art. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2009.
  • Pearce, Susan M. Museums, Objects and Collections. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992.
  • Schellenberg, T.R. Modern Archives: Principles and Techniques. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1956.
  • Schimmel, Paul and Kristin Stiles. Out of Actions: Between Performances and the Object, 1949 – 1979. New York: Thames and Hudson, 1998.
  • Shanks, Michael and Christopher Witmore, “Memory Practices and the Archaeological Imagination in Risk Society: Design and Long Term Community.” in Unquiet Pasts: Risk society, lived cultural heritage, and re-designing reflexivity, edited by Stephanie Koerner and Ian Russell. Surrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing, 2010.
  • Speiker, Sven. Big Archive: Art from Bureaucracy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2008.
  • Thomas, William G. “Computing and the Historical Imagination.” In A Companion to Digital Humanities, edited by Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens and John Unsworth. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004. http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/ (accessed July 15, 2010).
  • Wardrip – Fruin, Noah. “Hypermedia, Eternal Life and the Impermanence Agent.” Paper presented at the Digital Arts and Culture Conference, Atlanta, GA, 1999.
  • Weschler, Lawrence. Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder: Pronged Ants, Horned Humans, Mice on Toast, and Other Marvels of Jurassic Technology. New York, NY: Vintage Books, 1995.
  • Yerushalmi, Josef Hayim. “Series Z: An Archival Fantasy.” European Journal of Psychoanalysis 3-4 (1997).
  • Zettl, Herbert. Back to Plato’s Cave: Virtual Reality.” In Communication and Cyberspace: Social Interaction in an Electronic Environment, edited by Lance Strate, Ron Jacobson, and Stephanie B. Gibson, 83 – 94. Cresskill, New Jersey: Hampton Press, Inc., 1996.

 

Chapter 16:  Fernando Bermejo: The Evolution of Audience Labor: Appropriating Online Activities

(still to be inserted)


Chapter 17:  Niels Brügger: Digital History and a Register of Websites: An Old Practice with New Implications

  • Agger, Gunhild. Dansk tv-drama: Arvesølv og underholdning. Copenhagen: Samfundslitteratur, 2005.
  • Baker, Simon, and Olwen Terris, editors. A for Andromeda to Zoo Time: The TV holdings of the National Film and Television Archive 1936-1979. London: British Film Institute, 1994.
  • Brügger, Niels. “The Archived Website and Website Philology: A new Type of Historical Document?” Nordicom Review 29(2) (2008): 155-75.
  • –––“Website history and the Website as an object of study.” New Media & Society 11(1-2) (2009): 115-32.
  • –––Website analysis: Elements of a conceptual architecture. Aarhus: the Centre for Internet Research, 2010.
  • –––“Web history, an emerging field of study.” In Web History, edited by Niels Brügger, 1-25. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2010.
  • Cohen, Daniel J., Michael Frisch, Patrick Gallagher, Steven Mintz, Kirsten Sword, Amy Murrell Taylor, William G. Thomas III, and William J. Turkel. “The Promise of Digital History.” The Journal of American History 95(2) (2008): 452–91.
  • Cohen, Daniel J., and Roy Rosenzweig. Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006.
  • Einstein, Dan, Nina Leibman, Randall Vogt, Sarah Berry, Jillian Steinberger, and William Lafferty. “Source guide to TV family comedy, drama, and serial drama, 1946-1970.” In Private screenings: Television and the female consumer, edited by Lynn Spigel, and Denise Mann, 253-76. Minneapolis, MN, USA: University of Minnesota Press, 1992.
  • Febvre, Lucien, and Henri-Jean Martin. The coming of the book: The impact of printing 1450-1800. London/New York: Verso, 1998.
  • Hampshire, Edward, and Valerie Johnson. “The Digital World and the Future of Historical research” Twentieth Century British History 20(3) (2009): 396-414.
  • IMDb: The Internet Movie Database. http://www.imdb.com.
  • O’Regan, Tom. Australian National Cinema. London/New York: Routledge, 1996.
  • The Paley Center for Media, the Collection. http://www.paleycenter.org/collection.
  • Thompson, Kristin, and David Bordwell. Film history: An introduction. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1994.
  • Walravens, Hartmut, ed. International newspaper holdings in German libraries: A catalogue of 18,000 newspapers, gazettes and related periodicals with locations and geographical index, 2. ed. München/New Providence/London/Paris: K.G. Saur, 1993.

 

Chapter 18: Adriana de Souza e Silva & Daniel M. Sutko: Placing Location-Aware Media in a History of the Virtual

  • Aubenque, Pierre. Le Problème de L’être chez Aristote: Essai sur la Problématique Aristotélicienne. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1962.
  • Baudrillard, Jean. Simulacra and Simulation. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1994.
  • Baudrillard, Jean. “The Masses: The Implosion of the Social in the Media.” New Literary History 16 (1985): 577-589.
  • Boltanski, Luc. Distant Suffering: Morality, Media and Politics. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
  • Borges, Jorge Luis. “The Garden of Forking Paths.” In Labyrinths: Selected Stories & Other Writings, edited by Donald A. Yates and James E. Irby, 19-29. New York: New Directions, 1962.
  • de Souza e Silva, Adriana. “From Simulations to Hybrid Space: How Nomadic Technologies Change the Real.” Technoetic Arts, 1 (2004): 209-221.
  • Deleuze, Gilles. Difference and Repetition. New York: Columbia University Press, 1994.
  • Deleuze, Gilles and Felix Guattarri. A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1987.
  • Dibbel, Julian. My Tiny Life: Crime and Passion in a Virtual World. New York: Henry Holt and Company, Inc, 1999.
  • Eco, Umberto. How to Travel with a Salmon & Other Essays. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1994.
  • Eco, Umberto. Travels in Hyperreality: Essays. San Diego: A Harvest Book, 1990.
  • Emmerich, Roland. The Thirteenth Floor. Culver City, CA: Columbia TriStar Home Video, 1999.
  • Fink, Eugen. “Die Spieldeutung der Metaphysik.” In Spiel als Weltsymbol. Stuttgart: W. Kohlhammer, 1960.
  • Gibson, William. Neuromancer. New York: Ace Books, 1994.
  • Gunkel, David. “Rethinking Virtual Reality: Simulation and the Deconstruction of the Image.” Critical Studies in Media Communication, 17 (2000): 45-62.
  • Hayles, N. Katherine. “The Condition of Virtuality.” In The Digital Dialectic: New Essays on New Media, edited by Peter Lunenfeld, 68-95. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2000.
  • Hayles, N. Katherine. How We Became Posthuman—Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1999.
  • Hayles, N. Katherine. “Embodied Virtuality: or How to Put Bodies Back into the Picture.” In Immersed in Technology: Art and Virtual Environments, edited by Mary Anne Moser, 1-28. Cambridge/London : MIT Press, 1996.
  • Hayles, N. Katherine and Nick Gessler. “The Slipstream of Mixed Reality: Unstable Ontologies and Semiotic Markers in the Thirteenth Floor, Dark City, and Mulholland Drive.” PMLA, 119 (2004): 482-499.
  • Irwin, William. The Matrix and Philosophy: Welcome to the Desert of the Real. Chicago and La Salle, Illinois: Open Court, 2002.
  • Johnson, Steven. Interface Culture: How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate. San Francisco: Harper Edge, 1997.
  • Katz, James and Mark Aakhus.  Perpetual Contact: Mobile Communication, Private Talk, Public Performance. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Cambridge University Press, 2002.
  • Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm. Philosophical Writings. New York: Dutton, 1934.
  • Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm. Monadology and Other Philosophical Essays. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co, 1965.
  • Moores, Shaun. “The Doubling of Place: Electronic Media, Time-space Arrangements and Social Relationships.” In Media/Space: Place, Scale, and Culture in a Media Age, edited by Nick Couldry and Anna McCarthy, 21-36. London: Routledge, 2004.
  • Moravec, Hans. Mind Children: The Future of Robot and Human Intelligence. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988.
  • Paul, Christiane. Digital Art. London, New York: Thames & Hudson, 2003.
  • Plant, Sadie. On the Mobile. The Effects of Mobile Telephones on Social and Individual Life. Motorola Inc. 28 Oct. 2001. Accessed September 27, 2003. http://www.motorola.com/mot/documents/0,1028,296,00.pdf
  • Plato. The Republic. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.
  • Poster, Mark. What’s the Matter with the Internet? Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2001.
  • Rheingold, Howard. The Virtual Community: Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2000.
  • Serres, Michel. Atlas. Lisboa: Piaget, 1997.
  • Shields, Rob. The Virtual. New York: Routledge, 2003.
  • Stephenson, Neal. Snowcrash. New York: Bantam Books, 1992.
  • Turkle, Sherry. Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995.
  • Warner Bros. The Matrix. Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video, 1999.

 

Chapter 19:  Simon Popple: “It’s Not Really Our Content”: The Moving Image and Media History in the Digital Archive Age

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